A letter to our doctor

We usually meet in a clinic situation of course. Whilst I and the nurses don’t treat you with the proper respect and joke about all the time you spend away from the hospital playing golf (which you don’t) there is always a professional boundary. A line which I don’t feel I can step over.

At the MPS conference though I took the chance to give you a hug and tell you how much I thought of you. You laughed it off with a comment about being emotionally unavailable. You may also have thought I was a little bit tipsy. (I suppose I was, but I’d only had one glass – just enough to loosen my tongue.)

I’ve written about the wonderful¬†nurses before and how they kept me going. But at a time when some pediatric doctors’ expertise and integrity has been called into question by sections of the media, I think it’s important you know what you yourself mean to our family, and I’m sure many others.

Just over two years ago, on Wednesday the 1st July 2015, we were told that our youngest son has MPS II, a progressive, life-limiting condition. These are the words that no parent wants to hear. Ever. We had been called in to see our local pediatrician who confirmed the diagnosis we had been expecting. And he told us that an appointment had been arranged for us to see the experts in Manchester the following Monday.

You’re probably used to shell-shocked parents arriving in your office, but to us of course it was all new. And yet… Having heard the worst already (at least I thought we had) it was reassuring to be there amongst people who knew all about this terrible diagnosis.

I’d already read everything the internet had to offer on Hunter Syndrome, or so it seemed. But you were so patient explaining it all again to Hubby and taking us through the next steps, telling us about the enzyme replacement treatment Pudding could start the next week. I’ve no idea how long we were in that office – over an hour I think – but I never felt that you were rushing us.

Over the next few weeks you often popped in when Pudding was having his ERT to see how we were doing and answer my questions. I had a lot, and you never shied from giving me the difficult answers. It was often hard to hear, but I needed and appreciated your honesty.

You joke about the nurses calling you emotionally unavailable but I think we all know that is far from the truth. When you had to tell me that Pudding’s DNA results showed a complete gene deletion (meaning inevitable progression of Hunter Syndrome) I could see how deeply you cared about us all. ¬†Later when we talked about the fight that MPS IV patients had (and will face again) for a treatment to be made available, your anger at the situation was clear.

I have entrusted my son’s life to many people already – anesthetists, surgeons, pharmacists, even down to those who safely access either of his ports – but you are the expert at the heart of all these services. A kind, caring, down-to-earth, approachable expert that I am very grateful to rely on.

All our love,

From your biggest fans

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